Against the Grain of Industrial Agriculture

Against the Grain of Industrial Agriculture

Intrigued by a few loaves of bread that stood out among the rest at a bakery in Asheville, North Carolina, writer April McGreger visited Farm and Sparrow Bakery to discover the revitalization of a long forgotten practice.  Farm and Sparrow’s owner and baker, David Bauer, sees himself an actor in the “larger decentralized, healthy, and diverse food system.” At Farm and Sparrow’s, landrace grains are sourced, ground, and baked on sight. This locavore infrastructure disappeared from our national landscape in the 1880s, with the emergence of steel roller mills and the rise of Midwest grown wheat. However, with the modern varieties of wheat failing to keep up with the diversity of landscapes and climates, it’s anticipated that traditional mills processing local, landrace grain varieties will be quickly making a comeback across the nation.  

Check out April McGregor’s full article, “Against the grain of industrial agriculture, truly local bread stages a comeback,” and find inspiration in the story of local millers and bakers.

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