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The Oyster Divers

The Oyster Divers

The Oyster Divers

The Oyster Divers

The practice of handpicking wild oysters is very rare. The majority of oysters we eat are grown in farms at the surface of the water. Other wild oyster practices include ‘raking’, which involves dragging a rake along the sea floor, creating larger scale, and often unseen damage and disturbance. By handpicking the oysters, not only are the divers able to choose the correct size (over 3 inches), thereby leaving the younger, underdeveloped oysters to grow, they also cause only a minor disturbance to the surrounding habitat.

Oysters are also well know to clean and filter the ocean, and several US harbor cities, including New York and Boston, have programs to reintroduce oysters to the waters in an effort to reduce pollution and encourage healthier habitats. In the part of the Long Island Sound where the film is set, the water is some of the cleanest on the Northeast coast. The presence of oysters plays a big part in that.

Watch this video to learn more about the oyster divers!

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